CUNTstitutional rights

cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Language

My rights as a woman stem from having the agency to do what I please with my body, and that includes what I choose to call my vagina.

If I were American, you could call this my CUNTstitutional right.

While I know that most of my friends despise the word “cunt”, personally, it’s one of my favorites.
cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English LanguageAs the wise Timone and Pumba once exclaimed:

“Thought of changing my name!” “Oh! What’s in a name!?”

Why should I have to filter the names that I would like to call MY body parts?

Surely, there are plenty of more disturbing nicknames for the vagina than the one syllable, four letter word, cunt.

Why do people hate the word “cunt” so much anyway?

cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Language

Deep.

It’s short and sweet, to the point, and quite descriptive! Although part of my love of the word comes from the ridiculous offence that people take from it, I need to find out the literary and cultural history of cunt, because doing so will clear the air on why the word is used so negatively today. My hope is to combat the negative connotation by digging it up from the root like a rotten radish, and unveiling what it could be!

I took to the Old English Dictionary to see where cunt came from.

The first definition was similar to how the word is used today because it defines cunt as the “female external genital organs” cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Language(OED). The first time that this word was used this way was in C1230, when it was used to name Gropecunt Lane, a street in London that was characterized by prostitution. The next occurrence of the word that I find most interesting is in D. Lindsay’s Satire Proclamation 144, where he notes, “First lat me lok thy cunt, Syne lat me keip the key”. Reading the passage out loud helps one find that meaning of it. Basically, the narrator wants to lock [the person he is talking to]’s vagina up, possibly desiring to keep it for himself, or to preserve her purity.

In the 1600’s, the meaning of the term evolves into “a comb”, which is strange, and I’m not sure where to go with that one… Sooooooo…. moving on.

The use of cunt as a term of vulgarity and abuse towards a woman began turning up in the first half of the 1900’s.

In 1929, the works, “Middle Parts of Fortune I. viii. 159” by F. Manning, use the word in this manner:
cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Language“What’s the cunt want to come down ‘ere buggering us about for, ‘aven’t we done enough bloody work in th’ week?”.
So, at this point, the term goes from describing a prostitute, or a space where they reside, to a comb, and then it was used to verbally abuse a woman (ie. calling her a whore), which is where it tends to stand today. Surprise Surprise! Yet another negative gesture towards women has been at a standstill for almost a century. Pathetic, really.

The last definition of the word cunt in the OED, is my personal favourite!

In fact, I’m going to cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Languagestart using this in my daily life! The usage is “cuntstruck”! Am I the only one who started singing ACDC’s “Thunderstruck” immediately after reading the word?
The presence of this term is prominent in Romance novels of the late 17th century. My favourite use of the word is from Sala’s “Harlequin Prince Cherrytop”, where the narrator says, “Changed from the gorgeous king to a buffoon, Be weak-kneed, cunt-struck, fucked-out Pantaloon”. What is even more interesting (even hilarious), is that this play is a pantomime, which is a family-friendly play that was usually performed during Christmas time. It was meant to be an outing where families would spend time together and sing along to the music in the play. Could you imagine?! A bunch of modestly clad children, bonnets and all, singing “cunt-struck” and “fucked-out pantaloon”?! Absolutely wonderful!

The infamous Juliet once asked,

“What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
 By any other name would smell as sweet” (Romeo and Juliet act II scene II).

cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English LanguageShowing that a name is not what is important, it’s what is inside that counts (D’awww, how sweet!), Shakespeare is perfect reason for why calling my vagina a cunt shouldn’t be such a big deal. In fact, I’m cunt-struck over the word cunt. While the history of the word has had its negative connotations, it’s time for this rotten radish to be shoved back into the dirt and used as a seed to grow something new!

While I understand the violence that words can create, I also understand the power they have to do something great.

No one can make the world stop saying the term, and I hope people continue to use cunt, women's rights, human rights, feminism, humour, words, reclaiming words, OED, history, English Literature, English Languageit, so why not use that to our advantage? The term “cunt-struck” has me connecting “cunt” to “love” or even “star” (ie. lovestruck and star struck).

Twinkle, twinkle, little cunt…

I mean, really, if “cunt” referred to a comb in the 1600’s, I don’t see why it can’t be a star now!

Thanks for reading my work, you glorious cunts!
xoxo.

4 thoughts on “CUNTstitutional rights

  1. As an erotic writer I’ve never felt comfortable using either the c word or the p word in my erotic poems and short stories preferring instead to us wetness, love canal, velvety sheath, honeycomb etc. On the other hand whenever I want to be sure to pull the short hairs of the rabid feminists I’ve been known to use two legged incubator and two legged sperm receptacle as descriptive terms for women.

  2. Good post! Such words as cunt should be taken back, from the abuse they have been under.

    In my native Finnish the closest parallel to a cunt is “vittu”, wich today is a swear word and there is even a sort of slang in wich adolescent kids use it as a punctuation mark in their speech.

    Originally it was the meaning of the mighty feminine magical force. In agrarian Finnish culture the woman was president of all of the household. It was the misstress of the house who held the keys to all the storages, all of the cattle was hers to keep, and in spring time her “vittu” would provide blessing to the cattle as it was first released after the long winter, by her standing over the door of the cow-shed, held often there by the men of the household. It was believed, that if a man left his tools, or weapons lying about on the floor a woman stepping over them would ruin them, because of the force of the “vittu”. The cunt was percieved to be so strong it could even turn the king of the forest, a bear away. There used to be old grannies who could be summoned to drive a bear away from cattle by ritually flashing their cunts to the forest, if a bear was seen around cattle. All these traditions are believed to be cultural heritage from beyond some 800 years, that is, from times before the Finns were forced to turn into Christianity.

    Even as a swear word – and we Finns do swear a lot – “vittu” has had a very strong connontation. But it would be good for people to understand the etymology of it.

    • Wow! The Finns are right! Cunt are tough!! This reminds me of a Betty White quote:

      “Why do people say “Grow some balls”? Balls are weak and sensitive! If you really wanna get tough, grow a vagina! Those things take a pounding!”
      -Betty White

      LOL!!

      • Ha! Nice quote. I have allways thought that the “Grow some balls” somehow refers to the testosterone, that actually causes us men do to extensively bold and stupid (as in, not thoroughly considered) stuff. 😉

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